26 February 2017

A question of sorts...

Hi everyone.  Sorry for my lack of posts but I've been quite sick recently and when I was able to get out of my sick bed and do something fun (in a quiet and constrained kind of way of course) I fiddled around with a bit of WW2 stuff for a change.

Now I'm starting to feel slightly human again (although to be honest right now it's ever so slightly) I thought I'd ask you all a question.

I'm sure I've read (or saw) somewhere that during the Cold War, a significant amount of West German civilian infrastructure (and in this case I mean things like trucking and other land vehicles) would have been taken up into service.  Pretty much every truck had a military role pre-assigned to it.  I assume that it would be the same in many of the smaller NATO members (read Denmark), even down to some "Home Guard" units using pressed civilian vehicles as their transport vehicles.

Over time, I've bought quite a few Oxford diecast vehicles, mainly for dressing the table with suitable 1980's era vehicles you might find in North West Europe.  But some of these will also make great rides for my newly finished Danish Home Guard.  Here's some examples:




Now I'm going to dirty these up to make them more lived in, but here's my question:  If a Home Guard type unit had pressed these kind of vehicles into service, do you think they would have repainted them, added cam nets, stowage or other things to make them appear "More military" or do you think they would not have bothered?

I'm torn.  Part of me thinks they'd do something to make them more military and less obvious for detection.  Assuming that a Soviet Hind pilot is likely to light up anything he sees moving in a NATO area.  But I also think you could go with the whole hiding in plain sight option.  Park one of these in a garage or in the street outside a house, and it just looks like another abandoned vehicle.  Travelling together it might look like just another group of refugees moving around behind the combat area...

The other point for not re-painting, camming up etc is that in games where they are not being used as home guard vehicles, they can be used a standard street furniture.

So what do you think?

Thanks

Richard


8 comments:

  1. My take on this is that there wouldn't have been time for a repaint unless the build up to war was quite prolonged but foliage, mud smears and cam nets would have been used as they're the easiest and quickest methods of camouflaging a vehicle. Also if you think about the pictures of civilian vehicles being used by fighting units in contemporary war zones such as Syria, Iraqi and Libya they mostly appear in civilian colours.

    If you leave them in civvie colours then it'll keep your opponent guessing as to whether it's a group of abandoned civilian vehicles up ahead or if there's potentially a home guard ambush waiting for them once they reach the cars.

    Cheers
    Richard

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  2. I think temporary cam nets would definitely add flavour. If you make them removable, then the dirtied up car/van can be revealed for other games. Depending on when the balloon goes up, there might not be time to re-spray of course, and they could feature in a scenario when home guard units are rushing to the front to plug a hole - on the basis of having temporary air superiority in the area?

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  3. I'd definitely leave them as is squire, less work all round and you can still use 'em as scenery.

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  4. I'd leave as is except for normal wear and tear,

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  5. I think it all depends on how your hypothetical war came to be. If there was a long lead-in time then expect a fair bit of camo painting and other 'militirisation'. If it's all a bit rushed then some cam nets and a rough daub of whatever drab paint comes to hand. So to answer your question - do a bit of everything!

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  6. In case of war any vehicle would be toned down with paint if available, or mud, if not, including the windscreens, unless you want a reflection to betray your position.

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  7. If anything, I could see the addition of netting and some kit strapped to the outside. Depending on the season, they might also strip off the doors to be able to load/unload quickly. If nothing else, you might see the addition of a "HEER" or similar placard on the side to indicate its role at checkpoints

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  8. Thanks for all your comments guys. I've taken them on board and will try to reflect a mixed approach with perhaps some magnetised sabots (or something like that). We'll see how we go.
    Thanks
    Richard

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